Policy has to answer strategy’s call in mobile

Scale

Now that we have had plenty of time to experiment with mobile, drawn our mobile strategy and released our real value apps that align with our strategy, its time to draw guidelines and shape our mobile policy. By combining the ‘What’ and ‘What not’ from our strategy with the ‘How’ and maybe even ‘How not or How Temporary’ in our policy we are making sure we are able to deliver solid solutions and leverage earlier investments in new concepts.

Play time in mobile is way over and we have moved away from just doing mobile on the side to doing mobile in line with the other channels.  Our mobile strategy gives us clear goals and often an explicit roadmap for future releases. Our clients and workforce expect solid solutions that are not a frantic feature feast but deliver true value to their needs in their context. They understand and appreciate our mobile solutions. The strategy we shaped is clearly visible and people are getting used to our full digital presence and the role mobile takes in the broad range of channels. Strategy gives us the right way. At least this is what mobile strategy could and should bring.

On the other hand we have to have a good idea of what we are able to deliver on our digital channels and mobile and how we can do that. Typically these kinds of policies are a bit left behind. Especially in the exploring stages of a an emerging and still immature channel as mobile we see that plenty of effort is put in realizing the mobile solutions, but they are often not connected to each other or to the realization of other digital channels. In that respect all the mobile initiatives feel like starting all over every time. This doesn’t only feel wrong, it is wrong. It might work well for a short period of time where go-to-market is very important but in the longer run it reduces your power to deliver. If every solution is a restart we cannot combine investments and maintenance of the solutions will be very costly.

Think of it as two legs, or a balance scale: if strategy is on the right then policy is on the left. We need them both on par to be able to move forward. Being able to execute our strategy effectively means that our policy should be at the same level. If your strategy becomes clearer and grows, so should your policy.

Let’s finish with three tips on leveling your policy with your strategy:

  1. If your systems are not up to speed to deliver integrated mobile solutions create a policy to use a temporary route to deliver, for instance with cloud technology. But also make sure you have a clear path to integrate the solution as it should have been done and add it to the budget of the initial release to make sure it will be done.
  2. Create some kind of front door, both physical and digital, a mobile inspiration center run by your own Mr. Mobile to answers questions around creating mobile solutions with the intent to help sharpening the solution and come with creative opportunities to realize the solution. Not scaring them away with large questionnaires, but to assist with the integration and realization of their app concept.
  3. What we typically see is that either the mobile initiative is with Marketing/HR or the IT department. If Marketing/HR is ahead make sure to connect and come on par as mentioned before. If you are in IT and want to be ready for mobile, make sure you have a clear understanding of the objectives for mobile for your organization. Being ready for mobile is not generic, its organization specific. Preparing a front door as stated in 2) might be a good initiative, but take it a step further and inspire the organization with mobile thinking. Organize inspiration and strategy workshops; interconnect with the business and shape possible mobile solutions together. After all that is what Business Technology is all about.
Arnd Brugman

About

Creative business technology management consultant with a major drive and passion for people value. Innovator with broad business and technology knowledge based on twenty years of experience in IT and fourteen years of management.

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