The Testing Bucket List

Ten years ago I joined Sogeti to support and build out the technical testing capability. Back then the second iphone had just been released but the world hadn’t been introduced to the iPad. The internet of things was yet to come and DVD and CD were the dominant form of media distribution and consumption.

Seeing how much the world of IT and testing has changed since then, got me wondering what sort of testing bucket list I would draw up for the next ten years ((Noun: a number of experiences or achievements that a person hopes to have or accomplish during their lifetime)

In no particular order they would be

  • Stop people talking about non-functional requirements and have it accepted that security, performance, usability, etc. are functions are a well designed, well executed and well-delivered system
  • Automate everything. Automation becoming the default, and not automating being the exception
  • Zero-touch testing. When we can know with a very high degree of confidence how good the system is, without needing to run a test – it’s not magic but the appliance of analytics, good practice, good test approach, and be able to assess does a test needed to run to prove the code
  • Stop accessibility testing being thought of as a nice-to-have if we have time, and be a key part of design, development, and testing
  • Testing being seen as an enabler to the P+L and not as something that slows down delivery and costs money.
  • Deliver an AI that can test any other AI for correct functioning (I know, ambitious but still doable)
  • Testing seen as an engineering vocation rather than a “break things” job perhaps through universities offering undergraduate degrees in Quality Engineering for Software / Systems

Agree? Disagree? What would your bucket list for testing cover?

Andrew Fullen

About

Andrew has been a managing consultant with Sogeti since 2009. In this role, he has worked on a number of major clients across government and private sectors covering tasks such as security test manager for a major government pan-agency project, helping with restructuring a bank rescued by the UK government during the financial crash, re-planning a major welfare project and architecting a performance policy and approach to address significant shortfalls in the delivered solution.

More on Andrew Fullen.

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